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At $2,260, is this 1973 Datsun 240Z project a good deal?

At $2,260, is this 1973 Datsun 240Z project a good deal?

Nice price or no dice 1973 Datsun 240Z

In case you haven’t noticed, the Datsun S30 has skyrocketed to the top of the charts in value terms. Today Nice price or no dice 240Z isn’t outrageously expensive, but that’s because it’s a project car. Let’s see if it’s worth making a map course for its restoration.

Have you ever reacquainted yourself with someone you once knew, only to find them completely different and surprisingly competent now? Maybe a goofy frat bro or ditzy sorority sister who is now an accomplished medical researcher or child development consultant? It’s disorienting, isn’t it?

The same can be said about Saab. We all know it as the company that once made quirky cars like the 1988 Saab 900 Turbo we looked yesterday. However, that Saab has long since disappeared, leaving today only the Saab that builds planes and armaments† Apparently we all still love the quirky automaker Saab of yesteryear, especially if the memory is something along the lines of yesterday’s $3,500 900 droptop, a car and a price, which together took a solid 64 percent Nice Price win.

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Saab is not the only company that has moved on in life. Nissan once called itself Datsun here in the United States, producing some of its most memorable products: cars like the 510, called the poor man’s BMW, and the sporty Z cars — all of them under that designation. Unlike Saab, Leaving the car market, the Japanese company Datsun turned into its home brand Nissan and never looked back. Well, outside Indiathat is.

So venerable were those early ones models under the name Datsunthat nowadays cars like the 510 and Z are impressive amounts. Coming in with one on the ground floor means there’s a good chance there’s some work to be done† This one 1973 Datsun 240Z clearly proves that probability in spades

Image for article titled At $2,260, is this 1973 Datsun 240Z your last chance to buy a cheap S30?

The car is presented while standing at a tow yard and the seller claims that: a certain piece of dusty Texas dirt is no longer a fiscally responsible place to store it. That means thatthe project has to go to a new owner with enough space and well… probably some welding skills.

Yes, there is rust in those sills. According to the photos, the rot is also in the doors, fenders and hatch frame. It’s a lot, but to take away all thoughts to just crumple the car and throw it over one shoulder, it should be noted that almost all of these Emmental emulsifying panels are easy: available in the aftermarket and virtually all problems can be fixed by a competent body shop – or a capable home restorer.

Image for article titled At $2,260, is this 1973 Datsun 240Z your last chance to buy a cheap S30?

Other issues that need attention contain an interior resembling a Hantavirus breeding ground. There are also some strange white gauges in the re-covered dashboard and a handlebar that looks like it came off a 90s 240SX.

Image for article titled At $2,260, is this 1973 Datsun 240Z your last chance to buy a cheap S30?

On the plus side, the motor seems intact and the seller claims it started and ran after a new battery was installed. The car rolls on later ZX wheels from another era, but it does keep it in the family. Those also seem to wear usable tires. Remarkably, the title is clean and the car bears Texas plates. Mileage is unknown as the counter appears to be broken or has turned.

The price for this project requires a bit of math as there are multiple components involved† The asking price for the car itself is €1,750. The tow yard where the Datsun is now calling home has to pay a $510 storage fee for its release. That adds up to a total of $2,260 and that’s what we’ll be tackling today. It looks like the storage fee will go up every month, so both the seller and a potential buyer can both be more than a barrel to close a deal as quickly as possible.

Image for article titled At $2,260, is this 1973 Datsun 240Z your last chance to buy a cheap S30?

What’s your take on that current deal and the car as a whole (or holes as it were)? Is $2,260 a fair price to get this S30 out of the car jail? Or is the rust just too discouraging and the car just too little to even ask for that little bit?

You decide!

austin, texas, Craigslistor go here when the ad disappears.

H/T to MaximillianMeen for the appointment!

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