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Pennsylvania ranks among top states in deer-vehicle collisions, says AAA

Pennsylvania ranks among top states in deer-vehicle collisions, says AAA

Pennsylvania is consistently among the top states for deer-vehicle collisions, according to AAA, and we are now entering the peak of deer mating season.

“We see a spike in the number of motorists hitting deer every October, November and December,” said Jana Tidwell, AAA Public Affairs. “Pennsylvania has traditionally been in the top three states in the country for the number of deer attacks we see here annually. Locally in the area of ​​Philadelphia’s five counties, Bucks County, Chester County, and Montgomery County are three of the top ten counties in the United States. Pennsylvania where we see the most deer strikes.”

Dave’s Automotive Repair in West Chester sees two to three damaged vehicles a month during the deer’s busy mating season.

“By far the worst we’ve seen here was a very nice lady who brought her car in. It really went in through her windshield and she got kicked in the face by the deer,” said JT Aloisio, Auto Repairs Manager. However, she was in a good mood. She made fun of it by saying all these things. It was right around Christmas time, so she said the reindeer were coming for her.’

Dave’s Automotive Repair in West Chester sees two to three damaged vehicles a month during the deer’s busy mating season.

Aloisio said he hit a deer in his grandfather’s truck last fall, and the damage was rapid, costing about $4,500.

In Pennsylvania, the average insurance claim was about $4,300 according to AAA.

“Early mornings, people coming to work, that’s when I hit a deer on my way to work,” Aloisio said. “Going home too, when it starts to get a little darker, then my stepmother was driving home, and she hit a deer on its way to get food for the family.”

Aloisio said his wife, brother and aunt had also collided with deer in recent years.

Pennsylvania is consistently among the top states for deer-vehicle collisions, according to AAA, and we are now entering the peak of deer mating season.

“It was a shame, it definitely put a damper on my morning,” said Aloisio.

Deer are more active and active during sunrise and sunset.

“Elime distraction behind the wheel. The phone, the radio, food and drink things like that. Focus on the roads,” Tidwell said. “If you have the unfortunate experience of hitting a deer, in the first place never approach the deer, park your vehicle on the side of the road to a safe place and call the police immediately.”

Here is additional safety information from AAA:

  • Pay attention to road signs. Yellow diamond-shaped signs with a deer image indicate areas of high deer activity.
  • Don’t drive distracted. Continuously scanning roads. Drivers must constantly sweep their eyes across the road in front of the vehicle looking for signs of animals and movement. Animals can also travel along the road, so look on both sides of the road as well. While the most likely crash occurs when drivers hit an animal, the animal can occasionally run into the vehicle.
  • Be especially alert in the early morning and evening hours. Many animals, especially deer, are most active from 5-8 a.m. and 5-8 p.m., which are the best travel times for many.
  • Use high beam if there are no oncoming traffic. You can spot animals earlier. Sometimes the light reflected from their eyes reveals their location.
  • Slow down and see if other deer appear. Deer rarely travel alone, so if you see one, there are probably more around.
  • Slow down when cornering. It is more difficult to spot animals in curves.
  • A long shot. A long knock on your horn can scare animals away from your vehicle.
  • Resist the urge to swerve: Instead, stay in your lane with both hands firmly on the wheel. Avoiding animals can confuse them so that they don’t know which way to run. It can also put you in the path of oncoming traffic or cause you to crash into something like a lamppost or a tree.
  • If the crash is imminent, take your foot off the brake: hard braking pulls the front of your vehicle down, allowing the animal to drive up over the hood towards your windshield. By releasing the brake, drivers can be protected from impact with the windshield as the animal is more likely to be pushed to one side of the vehicle or over the top of the vehicle.
  • Always wear a seat belt. The chance of getting injured when hitting an animal is much higher if you don’t have your seat belt on.
  • Drivers should consider getting comprehensive insurance if they don’t already have one. Comprehensive insurance is the type of insurance that covers animal strikes.