General

Report details how car emissions fell across Europe by 2021

Report details how car emissions fell across Europe by 2021

For example, according to Jato’s data, Toyota is only 16th with a total figure of 108.8 g/km, despite a hybrid mix of 69% for Western Europe in 2021 (from the company’s own figures).

Honda did even less well. Despite almost half of its 2021 sales in Europe coming from the fuel-efficient Jazz hybrid supermini, the CO2 figure for the whole year was 114.6 g/km. The brand hasn’t sold a PHEV yet and didn’t shift enough from the appealing but expensive E electric city car to move the needle.

Also surprisingly far behind, given the small car lineup, is Suzuki, at 117.7g/km, again demonstrating the need for plug-in vehicles (or in the case of the Across, a revamped Toyota RAV4 PHEV, more of them) to seriously improve CO2 levels.

How OEMs achieve their goals

But wait, you say, why is it that most car makers don’t pay fines to the EU and the UK, given that the 99g/km CO2 average falls short of the 95g/km target set by both legislators?

The target of 95 g/km can be adjusted for brands, depending on the weight of the cars sold. So BMW Group said it has managed to meet a target of 115.9 g/km CO2 by 2021 for its cars sold in the EU, along with Norway and Iceland, 10 g/km better than the set target of 126 g/km.

Jaguar Land Rover, meanwhile, has a separate target, agreed upon when the UK was in the EU, so Land Rover’s figure of 169.3g/km isn’t a disaster.

Last year, car manufacturers were able to count the sales of a car with emissions of less than 50 g/km. EVs or PHEV – worth 1.67 sales in the super credit system. This year, that has fallen to 1.33 sales.

And finally, those who couldn’t hope to succeed “pooled” their average with someone significantly better.

Tesla was popular. Both JLR and Honda have paid to count their zero-emission sales as part of their combined total, and Honda will also join Tesla to form a pool in the UK by 2022.

The penalty for missing the targets is expensive: €95 or £86 for every gram more than the target, per car sold.